Typographers for Designers- Eric Gill

This one’s a bit strange to me…..

Bio Summary

“Gill was born in 1882 in Steyning, Sussex, and grew up in the Brighton suburb of Preston Park. He was the elder brother of MacDonald  Gill (1884–1947), the well known graphic artist. In 1897 the family moved to Chichester. He studied at Chichester Technical and Art School, and in 1900 moved to London to train as an architect with the practice of W.D. Caroe, specialists in ecclesiastical architecture. Frustrated with his training, he took evening classes in stonemasonry at Westminster Technical Institute and in calligraphy at the Central School of Arts and Crafts, where Edward Johnston, creator of the London Underground typeface, became a strong influence. In 1903 he gave up his architectural training to become a calligrapher, letter-cutter and monumental mason.”

Type Summary

“In 1925 he designed the Perpetua typeface, with the uppercase based upon monumental Roman inscriptions, for Morison, who was working for the Monotype Corporation. An in-situ example of Gill’s design and personal cutting in the style of Perpetua can be found in the nave of Polingchurch in West Sussex, on a wall plaque commemorating the life of Sir Harry Johnston. He designed the Gill Sans typeface in 1927–30, based on the sans-serif lettering originally designed for the London Underground. (Gill had collaborated with Edward Johnston in the early design of the Underground typeface, but dropped out of the project before it was completed.) In the period 1930–31 Gill designed the typeface Joanna which he used to hand-set his book, An Essay on Typography.”

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My Description

It does have some traits that of New Times Roman that’s easily recognizable other than that it’s a pretty average font to use. Still, I find this font kind of mediocre and almost no use but for typing out blogs and papers like these.

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